Climate change affecting conditions across South Plains

Climate change affecting conditions across South Plains

A new study released by the White House on climate change painted a bleak picture, one in which the president disavows.

According to the study, changes are being felt in a variety of different ways including increased wildfires and heat waves which Lubbock has experienced.

 "What we see is an increase in the variability particularly in the heat," said John Zak, with Texas Tech's Climate Science Center. "So we're going to be looking at hotter climate, we're also going to be seeing changes in when rainfall occurs, how much rainfall occurs, and of course with Lubbock having an agricultural economy, it's going to have a big impact on what we do."

Impacts meaning how producers grow their crops which Steve Verett with Plains Cotton Growers said he has noticed for quite some time.

"I think about when I first started farming about the varieties and the irrigation methods that we used in those days, it's evolved greatly since then," Verett said. 

Zak said the increasing variables in the climates are making it tougher to evolve.

"You have to know how much they have to water, they have to know if they can do dry land, they also have to look at should they do no till agriculture and it's all part of this economic process," Zak said. "They want to be able grow a crop economically."

"The weather and the climate is always going to be changing and we have to be ready to adapt to whatever it is that we're confronted with," Verett said.

Zak said with a little help from everyone climate change can be slowed and we can see results.

"I think one of the lies that's perpetrated, that we perpetrate on ourselves is that small things don't matter," he said. "And for an individual person, an individual household, do what you can, but if you have 280,000 people in Lubbock doing that, you've made a big impact."

Powered by Frankly